Tag Archives: data

You are wearing & using health apps but is your care provider using that info?


As you know I follow the mHealth world from the perspective of the patient. Recently I read an article that gave some data on the use of mHealth apps and what the care provider is doing with it. I was genuinely surprised at the statistics. The article  (patient wearable data use) states that while 41% of Americans use the technology only 6% of the care providers were currently using the data from the patient. Working in the healthcare IT field that, as I said, was surprising. While in the field we are starting to use software allowing more patient access to patient’s information it seems we are slow to the start. Another statistic that surprised me was that 29% had no intention of using the data.

A while back, I contributed a blog post that spoke of the use of mHealth data affecting who we choose as care providers – perhaps we want to utilize care providers that are actually using our data and with whom we can see the information from our visits to take more proactive steps in managing our health. Following that train of thought does this mean that the utilization of your data (well, maybe your data) is 94% just not happening?

Another article noted that only 17 percent of consumers perceive health-related industries as being most innovative today. And that “Even in today’s modern world, people think that healthcare innovation will help physicians better treat patients most,” Keith Liu, Klick senior vice president of products and innovation said in a statement. “This suggests that, when it comes to healthcare, people still want a human connection, empathy, and other benefits that can only be obtained through the patient-physician experience.”

So we, as patients, want to see our data, often a constant effort to collect by the patient, and the care providers data and notes but we do still want that care provider to use the information in a face-to-face/human interaction and view that as an optimal care scenario.

Do you use health apps? Does your care provider use your data? And how important are the two factors – use of data and transparency of data and/or human interaction – to you?

 

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Data & Big Brother in healthcare


I happened across an article on data and the Big Brother effect which included data in healthcare. I’m a bit perplexed, surprised and honestly a teeny bit worried. We know that they get data on what we watch on TV. We know that they can track trending health issues using Twitter. We know that health insurance claim information has been tracked and some allegations have been made that it has/could be used against the patient in regard to cost/deductibles and even the ability to obtain coverage. My mother has had issues with this as she has what is called a pre-existing condition in the insurance world – meaning that she had a medical condition before purchasing the insurance so they won’t pay for anything to do with continued treatment.

Now, according the article, even more data is currently being mined and applied to managing/tracking the health of populations.Honestly, I was a bit shocked as to what data they were using.

 

According to report authors Pam Dixon and Robert Gellman, these include: retailer databases, financial sector non-credit information, commercial data brokers, multichannel direct response, online surveys, catalog and phone orders, warranty card registrations, Internet sweepstakes, retailer loyalty cards, lifestyle information gathered from fitness and wellness centers, and non-profit organization member or donor lists.

 

LexisNexis is one of the largest data mining companies out there. They reportedly are using court records and housing information to assist with population health management. I am puzzled by how this information could be used for that purpose. What data or information specifically are they using?

If we start using social media data – and I have to wonder what source(s) they might be tapping for this collection – then they might find out information that isn’t shared with providers of health care – more along the line of their daily habits. Do they party/drink, go skydiving, drive cars too fast…

What are your thoughts on this subject?


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