Tag Archives: internet

IoT = Internet of Things


Well, I learned a new acronym last week. Kinda catchy. And makes me chuckle. I’ve focused on wearables quite a bit on this site and talked about integration with the care provider’s systems. But, it seems, there is a whole world of “things” that I may have been leaving out -especially when it comes to cyber security. It’s the “Internet of Things”! And for those in healthcare IT we go even further to say IoMT – Internet of Medical Things.

The Internet of things (IoT) is the inter-networking of physical devices, vehicles (also referred to as “connected devices” and “smart devices“), buildings, and other items embedded with electronics, software, sensors, actuators, and network connectivity which enable these objects to collect and exchange data

The question, in relating it to healthcare apps, is whether this IoT keeps everything secure if only the methods and safeguards around laptops, desktops and the behind the scenes servers are secured. (My post stems from this article on the topic.) It seems that those in the know or working in healthcare IT believe that, yes, they are secure for those reasons. They also report that with the methods of monitoring their networks they can tell when something is “not behaving as intended.”

So let’s flip the situation: If that care provider’s IoT has been compromised and your device (iPhone, iPad, etc) connects to it at the provider’s office could it compromise your device?

Drilling down specifically into the vulnerabilities and security risks of IoMT devices, Beth Musumeci, vice president, cybersecurity at GE Healthcare, said the threat is significant, as connected health devices, by definition, “increase the attack surface.”

Though most health systems have made advancements on the cyber security front those small rural areas who have just been struggling to get internet at their facilities are well behind the ball of the huge health conglomerates. Another aspect is the massive numbers of IoMTs that must be addressed.

Rasu Shrestha, M.D., chief innovation officer at UPMC and executive vice president at UPMC Enterprises:

What’s more, providers are becoming increasingly dependent on Internet-based resources to facilitate patient care, Shrestha said, noting that UPMC has 105,000 connected devices to manage and support. These connected devices, which are connected to networks and the cloud, have the potential to act as a gateway to break into a hospital’s main networks

(take a look at the article here)

By 2020, 78.5 million number of people worldwide will be using home health technologies … By 2019, 87 percent of healthcare facilities will implement IoMT, up 60 percent from this year.

Cyber security, to me, seems to be a swiftly growing “next big thing” in IT. And that doesn’t apply to just the medical arena. It applies to your bank, your home internet, and the nail salon where you might connect to their internet while they paint your toenails pink.

Looks like we’ve got another topic to follow on here!

Advertisements

Social media and healthcare


I bet you use Facebook…bet you Google for information, too. Do you Tweet? If you read my previous post about Tweeting for your health you might know that Twitter is becoming a sort of marketing and information source for healthcare. I know of many hospitals, healthcare organizations and public health organizations that use Twitter as information outlets to target specific chronic disease populations. For example, my mother, sister and I have essential tremor so I “like” the International Essential Tremor Foundation Facebook page. It provides information regularly on the disease state as well as activities that are going on.

courtesy Power DMS Suite

courtesy Power DMS Suite

 

 

This infographic (picture with information) has some interesting statistics on how healthcare is using social media today. Of interest to me, because I am also very careful with my personal Facebook page versus my public pages, is the percentage of the physicians that DO accept Facebook friend requests from their patients. Unless I was truly a friend of that physician I think that I would want to respect their privacy, and mine, by not being their FB “friend”.

So how do you use social media in your healthcare life? Are you a fan/”liker” of any hospital or health system Facebook pages? Do you follow a chronic disease group on Twitter?


Do you print or view? Information today…


Working in IT (information technology) we are always conscious of printing. We try to avoid it. It is, in our world, similar to being caught using your finger to get some icing off the wedding or birthday cake when no one is looking. (yes, Tisha humor/opinion.)

So how do you get your information? Do you print off directions from MapQuest? or do you send them via text to your smart phone? Or even have that handy navigation system in your car? What about your grocery list? Is it on paper or do you have a handy app on your smart phone or iPad? Do you read paperbacks or use a Kindle/Nook/iPad?

A recent article in HIT Consultant noted the top 20 most insightful infographics of 2012. (infographics = pictures with words and/or information.)

courtesy HealthEd Academy

courtesy HealthEd Academy

 

This particular one seems to give some good statistics on how patients are learning in our age of technology. Healthcare extender I take to mean a healthcare provider. It is interesting that the majority of information given to patients is printed. Yet, when I think about some of the meaningful use requirements, one is to provide patient education upon discharge. So they print the information. Even if they were to give you links to videos or websites they print them on paper. I haven’t seen anyone emailing info rather than printing though that doesn’t mean that it doesn’t happen.

The infographic does point out that the provider (extenders) are getting their information from technology (online) resources. I would say that the majority of those resources are available to the general public, also. Yet there is often so much information available that it is contradictory or confusing for us when we search. There are some information providers that we feel are true and correct resources such as WebMD.

So how do you get information from your healthcare provider? Do you do your own research? If yes, is it before or after you see the provider? or both?


%d bloggers like this: