Tag Archives: mhealth apps

You are wearing & using health apps but is your care provider using that info?


As you know I follow the mHealth world from the perspective of the patient. Recently I read an article that gave some data on the use of mHealth apps and what the care provider is doing with it. I was genuinely surprised at the statistics. The article  (patient wearable data use) states that while 41% of Americans use the technology only 6% of the care providers were currently using the data from the patient. Working in the healthcare IT field that, as I said, was surprising. While in the field we are starting to use software allowing more patient access to patient’s information it seems we are slow to the start. Another statistic that surprised me was that 29% had no intention of using the data.

A while back, I contributed a blog post that spoke of the use of mHealth data affecting who we choose as care providers – perhaps we want to utilize care providers that are actually using our data and with whom we can see the information from our visits to take more proactive steps in managing our health. Following that train of thought does this mean that the utilization of your data (well, maybe your data) is 94% just not happening?

Another article noted that only 17 percent of consumers perceive health-related industries as being most innovative today. And that “Even in today’s modern world, people think that healthcare innovation will help physicians better treat patients most,” Keith Liu, Klick senior vice president of products and innovation said in a statement. “This suggests that, when it comes to healthcare, people still want a human connection, empathy, and other benefits that can only be obtained through the patient-physician experience.”

So we, as patients, want to see our data, often a constant effort to collect by the patient, and the care providers data and notes but we do still want that care provider to use the information in a face-to-face/human interaction and view that as an optimal care scenario.

Do you use health apps? Does your care provider use your data? And how important are the two factors – use of data and transparency of data and/or human interaction – to you?

 


How well will wearables and mHealth apps work with the individual?


Just read an article which discussed the challenges that wearables, or the wearable vendors, face in actually helping the individual. Though very interesting on the discussion I am not sure I completely agree with the expert that the author interviewed. Part of me wonders if the expert really understands what the wearables purpose truly is and has kept up with the expected functions of the wearables – since some of them that they specifically point out have not even hit the market yet and speculation is varied on what they will include. I wrote a blog for my company that talks about wearables in case you want to check that out here.

Wearables are on the market and currently target specific areas such as walking steps and diabetes information. We are anxiously awaiting what the new Apple app is going to do. From what I have read the app has a lot of functions and most are tied to devices that integrate with the app. (That is the short story but if you want more check out the link above.)

The expert interviewed by the author in the first article I pointed out makes some good observations or points on what the mainstream individuals may want from wearables or even mHealth apps. He states that they want some kind of reward or motivation to keep the individual using the wearable or app. One that caught my attention was the use of personal goals. Devising the wearables to produce data or to help the individual achieve goals set by the individual. That is a great idea and one that is currently used in several fitness apps today. Another that made me go “wow!!” is a financial incentive such as insurance discounts. My first question is how are they going to know at the insurance company that I’ve used my wearable to achieve a goal in order to give me the discount? This is going back to the data and Big Brother that I did an earlier blog on. While I would really like to have those monetary incentives I have many concerns on who would have access to my data and be using it specifically for me. I’m really not so concerned with what we in the industry call “scrubbed data” or data that has the personal identifiers removed. There is that big thing called HIPAA act that I kinda like a lot.

What I really disagree with the expert about is that the users will become bored with the wearables or the apps. But I do admit that if an app requires too much daily work for me, as I experienced with the food tracking on MyFitnessPal, I don’t think I would keep up with it – I didn’t on the app I mentioned. If an app or wearable is providing usable information that is easy for the user/wearer to use then I think our culture of individuals that are trying to make their lives more healthy, for whatever reason, will be using it. If it is popular or fashionable with the public then there is even more reason for its use.

What do you think? Would you use a wearable? What would you want from the wearable or app to make it a long-term use?


Smartphone Apps & the Healthcare Setting


In a recent blog post for Pivot Point Consulting I share information and thoughts on the use of smartphones in the health setting. We use a lot of health apps as we have become a society that is much more aware of our health over the last 10 years. We use fitness app, those with health/diseases use apps to monitor their disease state and the healthcare providers use apps to provide at the hand information. So what do you use your smartphone for related to your health?

 

smartphone


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